Calling UK Sugar Cat Owners - help with equipment

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (Welcome & Main Forum)' started by Douglas_my ginger cat, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2020
    Morning all!

    Can those that live in the UK help me with identifying and sourcing the below products (ideally at the cheapest price but without skimping on quality):

    Glucose Meters
    I know it has been mentioned that human meters are fine to use but may produce slightly different (I think higher) results. If I present readings to my vet, will they be able to understand the readings or do I need to 'convert' them to feline readings (if that makes sense). What meters are best and where can I get them. This also includes the reordering of strips.

    Syringes
    Where is the best place to buy syringes. My vet got me Caninsulin syringes which I believe are 12mm U40 29G but I believe that there are smaller needles available as I feel that this size is a little painful for Douglas. As they were branded I believe this was also much more expensive then what I could get. Where is the best place to buy?

    Insulin
    I am going to speak to my vet about putting Douglas on Prozinc as I have been told this is a slower releasing insulin that is better for cats. I know I do not need to buy this from the vet, but can get the prescription and buy elsewhere. Where would be the best place to buy these?

    Any other items/tips
    And if there are any other tips on items that might be helpful in our journey would be greatly appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance!
     
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  2. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
  3. Georgiana & Perlutz

    Georgiana & Perlutz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Hi Anna!

    Syringes - Myself and other UK members use the VetUK own brand syringes. They are A LOT cheaper and they work just as good. https://www.vetuk.co.uk/veterinary-supplies-insulin-syringes-c-141_154/vetuk-0-5ml-u40-insulin-syringe-with-needle-box-of-100-p-11335

    G
    lucose meter - There are many options here, any meter that has affordable and easy to buy test strips would do. I think the UK favourite is AccuCheck which you can find in most pharmacies and online. You could buy it in Boots and you will earn points (if you have an Advantage card) that you can later use to buy more strips or a treat for yourself.

    Codefree is another option with very cheap supplies and it can be bought from Amazon. When I was looking a year ago, it had mixed reviews on Amazon but people here on FDMB seemed happy with it.

    I would advise against using the AlphaTrak as the test strips will end up costing you an arm and a leg and they are only sold in few places online.

    As for the vet, that will depend a lot on the vet himself...Many still strongly advise against home testing :banghead::banghead: and recommend useless and expensive curves done in their practice :banghead::banghead: Please don’t fall for that! The human meters generally show a slightly lower BG, but it’s definitely something your vet can work with without having to revise his math skills for conversions. Next time you take Douglas in for a check, you can ask the vet to check the same drop of blood with his meter and yours as well. That will give you a rough estimate of the difference.

    Insulin - There is currently a world wide shortage of Prozinc :arghh: The manufacturer advised the earliest it will be back on shelves will be mid August and then I am sure it will fly off the shelves immediately! You could use this time to persuade your vet to prescribe Prozinc as it’s a more gentle, slower acting insulin and it has generally shown better results.

    My cat has been on Caninsulin at the beginning and didn’t do well on it. As soon as I’ve changed him on Prozinc, I’ve seen a massive improvement in him! Because of the Prozinc shortage, I might have to change him back to Caninsulin until Prozinc is back and I am DREADING it!!!!

    I’m glad you found FDMB, you will find great help here for you and Douglas :bighug:
     
  4. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
  5. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Hi Georgiana,

    Glad to hear that your kitty was doing well on the Prozinc. My girl didn't do well on Caninsulin either so I feel your pain at the thought of your little fella having to switch back if you can't get hold of Prozinc in time.

    It's been a fair while since I was using insulin but at the time vets were allowed through drug cascade rules to prescribe other insulins for cats if they had demonstrably poor regulation on Caninsulin (Prozinc hadn't received approval for use in cats at that time). I was able to get Lantus for my girl (she did w-a-y better on it). Maybe you could ask your vet whether that might be an option instead of going back on Caninsulin?


    Mogs
    .
     
  6. Elizabeth and Bertie

    Elizabeth and Bertie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Hi Mogs!!! :bighug:
     
  7. Elizabeth and Bertie

    Elizabeth and Bertie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Hi, do take a look at this link which has a whole lot of info for UK newcomers....glucose meters...syringes....etc..... If this doesn't answer your questions please do shout out!
    Regarding Prozinc, it is quite hard to obtain in the UK at the moment (manufacturer issue). A few vets still have some, many don't. The interruption to supply is apparently temporary, thankfully...
    UK INFORMATION (Food, Insulin, Vit B12, and other 'need to know' stuff)

    Eliz
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  8. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Of course I do Mogs! Wasn’t sure if you’d want to get overly involved but if you do, great! :)
     
  9. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    *** WARNING: LONG POST ***

    Hello, Douglas' human (sorry, I don't know your own name!),

    It's been a while since I bought any supplies but here are some things that I found helpful.

    Syringes
    -----------

    Initially I used U40 syringes for Caninsulin which I got from my vet but later I bought them from eBay (cheaper).

    When Saoirse switched to Lantus I used to purchase Becton Dickinson 0.3ml Microfine Demi syringes (6mm needle, ½ unit markings)*, again from eBay.

    (* FOR INFO ONLY: It is possible to use U100 syringes with U40 insulin by using a conversion chart to work out the dose to draw. It can be helpful if trying to draw up finer doses of U40 insulin as regulation improves. Please ask for advice and help with this here on the board should you ever need to consider this option, because you need to be very careful measuring the doses when using this technique.)

    Glucometers
    ---------------

    I used an Alphatrak 2. This was a purely personal choice. (I have anxiety problems and it was more reassuring to my messed up brain to use a veterinary meter.) I purchased my Alphatrak from my vets: there was only a couple of quid the difference between their price and what I could get online and I like to support our practice as much as I can (they're very good to me).

    I used to buy my test strips from animeddirect.co.uk - cheapest that I could find, and a very reliable supplier.

    I have an Accucheck (Aviva IIRC?) as a backup glucometer. I used to get test strips from Morrison's (they were same price as cheapest online at the time, Boots were more expensive).

    Insulin
    ---------

    I used to get Caninsulin 10ml vials from the vet (in early days of Saoirse's treatment). You can get it online so it might be cheaper (but be sure to factor in the cost of the vet's prescription and any shipping cost).

    For Lantus, our vets carry pen cartridges at reasonable rates. Lantus being a human insulin preparation it's also available from local pharmacies with a vet's prescription. Our vets don't carry 10ml vials so I used to get them from a local chemist. I've not seen Lantus offered for sale on any of the online veterinary pharmacy sites. I assume that this is because Lantus is not (yet) a licensed insulin for feline diabetics in the UK.


    General Tips (you may regret asking for these! :oops:)
    ---------------

    • Zooplus online offer a wide range of low carb wet foods. They do freeze dried protein treats (Cosma Snackies). Also a good site to check if you need raised feeding bowls.

    • eBay and Amazon are always worth a look for all manner of cat supplies: glucometers & test strips; blood ketone meters & test strips; sharps containers; timed feeders; mini measuring spoons; syringes; supplements like diabetic-friendly vitamins, pumpkin, psyllium, or Miralax; cat litter; urinalysis test strips, pipettes and sample containers; Katkor/Catrine non-absorbent litter for urine sample collection; pee pads, high-sided/covered litter boxes, etc.). eBay's usually cheaper but you may need to dig around a little bit to find the best prices. Also check expiry dates on things like urinalysis strips before ordering (I use Multistix 10SG strips).

    • OKOPlus Cat's Best litter is A Gift From The Kitty Gods! :woot: Forms very easily removable lightweight clumps (flushable!), keeps the litter box pretty much odour free, and it lasts much longer than clay-based litters. Go for the granular one (red flash on bag); the pellets are rubbish.

    • If you ever need slippery elm powder (for digestive tract), Neal's Yard used to do an organic one.

    • If you ever need to give an omega-3 supplement but your cat can't tolerate fish oil sources, search online for a product called Moxxor (IIRC it's derived from green-lipped mussels but check the website for details - capsules are small enough for kitty to swallow). Not cheap, but very worth it if they help the kitty.

    • When looking for supplements always check that they're diabetic-friendly (no added sugars, etc.). People here are great for recommendations and sourcing tips!

    • When it comes to pet prescriptions sometimes your vet may sometimes prescribe human medicines but they themselves may only carry a branded version of the Rx med (because that's what their wholesalers offer). These can be hideously expensive. If a generic version of the human Rx med is available it can be much cheaper to ask your vet for a written Rx and then fill the prescription at your local pharmacy. A classic example of this is ondansetron. At 2016 prices the branded version, Zofran, was c. £100 for 30 tablets. By way of comparison, I got ondansetron either from a local chemist or online human pharmacy, with 30 tablets costing about £6-7 and the written prescription fee about £8; quite a saving (and a lifesaving drug!). Another useful med to know about is cyproheptadine (branded version is Periactin), an antihistamine with an appetite stimulant effect that's milder than that of mirtazapine - and with a better side effect profile - but some vets don't stock it in their in-house pharmacy. Like ondansetron, cyproheptadiine is also a human med and can be sourced from a local chemist with a written veterinary Rx (generic is cheap as chips).

    • If the prices your vet charges for prescriptions is prohibitive it is always worth checking prices online and determining whether the online cost plus the written vet Rx is cheaper. (IIRC by law in the UK your vet is obliged to issue a written Rx if you wish to fill the prescription elsewhere. I'm not sure whether the lunacy that is Brexit will change this.) If there's not much of a muchness in price then I've always preferred to put the business my vet's way: they need to pay for the bricks and mortar and I want to support the practice. My first port of call would be animeddirect.co.uk plus a few of the main sites like VetUK or petdrugsonline to compare prices.

    • A good pharmacy is a godsend. Sometimes it can be necessary to get special preparations of a kitty's regular meds (e.g. a liquid preparation of a med for a kitty who can't be pilled while recovering from an operation or dental work). Pharmacists are immensely helpful with sourcing and filling such prescriptions.

    • For prescription diets, it is definitely worth comparing prices online and at your vet's. It is also worth bearing in mind that with a bit of research it may be possible to find commercially available foods that fit a cat's dietary needs (though not always - some conditions can require a highly specific prescription diet).

    • It's really helpful to keep a daily log of your kitty's weight, food consumption, water intake, pee and poop output, meds and supplements, and brief notes on their clinical signs (e.g. the 5 Ps: playing, preening, purring, pooping, peeing). FYI, you can pick up reasonably priced digital baby scales on eBay or Amazon.

      The daily log can help you monitor their overall well-being and gauge how well/badly a particular diet or treatment is working (ETA: it's absolutely invaluable if you need to backtrack or reinstate a diet/treatment regimen that worked in the past). As we all know, cats are divils for hiding illness or discomfort. The log helps you to better know your kitty. It can help you to better spot patterns of subtle changes, thus serving as an early warning system to catch problems before they develop into something more serious.

    • Vets that are willing to work in partnership with you are worth their weight in gold. The more you learn yourself about your kitty's health needs the better the dialogue there will be between you. If you have learned from reputable online sources about potential treatments, it helps to bring printed evidence when discussing possible treatment options with your vet (and don't be shy about asking your vet about treatments - every cat is different and what suits one kitty may not suit another).

    • Never introduce any supplements or dietary changes without first discussing the changes with your vet. It's possible that the dietary and/or treatment options you wish to pursue may not be your vet's preferred choice but you need to be sure that your choices are SAFE!. Also, your vet always needs to know what food, supplements and meds a cat is receiving in order to diagnose and treat the animal safely and effectively. Without such information, a vet would be working in the dark - not a good idea.
    Sorry about the massive brain dump (bet you're sorry you asked now!). You might find it helpful to bookmark this post for future reference. The information above was very hard won and if it can help another kitty and their bean that's a good thing.


    Mogs
    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  10. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    I'm only risin' ya, Diana. ;) Thank you for being so considerate of my health issues. :bighug: Fatigue's an even worse problem for me nowadays (on top of the ever-present anxiety issues) but I'm going to try to dip in and share what experience I have - and can remember (I'm very rusty).

    Hope your day is going well and that you are feeling good in yourself. :bighug:


    Mogs
    .
     
  11. Georgiana & Perlutz

    Georgiana & Perlutz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Hi Mogs,

    Unfortunately my vet is one of the crazy ones who don’t believe in human insulin for cats :facepalm: But I will try to use this Prozinc shortage to our advantage, maybe he will give in to prescribing Lantus. If not, I’m just hoping what we have left in the vial will last us until the manufacturer gets things moving again. Anything but back on Caninsulin :arghh:
     
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  12. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Hi Eliz!! :bighug:

    .
     
  13. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Yes do look in when you can, Mogs, you have so much to offer. I think many of us suffer from burn-out here from time to time, and coupled with various issues of our own it can be tough to come here too often. We all just do what we can, when we can - and that’s great in my book! :)
     
  14. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Bummer! :mad:

    The vets Saoirse was under at time of Dx were [insert series of very strong expletives here]. It was thanks to finding FDMB that I got up the courage to get her properly diagnosed (they initially refused to run ANY diagnostics!!). At initial Dx Saoirse's BG levels were heading for the Oort cloud. We were lucky that she didn't end up in DKA.

    We switched to another practice shortly after and the gentleman who is now our main vet actually had a sugar cat himself and the difference in attitude was like night and day. Indeed, the practice as a whole has a much more progressive approach to treating feline diabetics and they are happy to work in partnership with this particular helicopter kitty parent. I provided our main vet with a copy of the Management of Diabetic Cats paper (used to be a link to it in one of the Lantus board's forum stickies) and it was a real help in securing Saoirse's Lantus Rx, as was her spreadsheet data.

    Keeping fingers and paws crossed at this end that you won't have to revert to the doggy insulin.


    Mogs
    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  15. jt and trouble (GA)

    jt and trouble (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Mogs you dont know how much you are appreciated...this much..:bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug:
     
  16. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Awww thank you, Jeanne! I appreciate you to. It's so nice to 'see' you again, I've missed you.

    :bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug::bighug:


    Mogs
    .
     
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  17. jt and trouble (GA)

    jt and trouble (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    likewise!
     
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  18. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

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    Jul 25, 2020
    Is it better to have raised feeding bowls?

    And thank you for the brain dump, its what I need and will most definitely flag to refer to later!!
     
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  19. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    It definitely helps cats with nausea and some digestive system issues to eat better. Because they don't have to dip their heads to eat and drink it's more comfortable for them.

    I've actually bookmarked it myself in case it might come in handy for other members in the future. Glad you found it helpful. :)


    Mogs
    .
     
  20. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2020
    Hi!

    I'm back. Thank you for the invaluable advice, I have made a list of places I can get cheaper items. I can get a sharps bin for £5 and the vets charged me £20, and its exactly the same! Do you know if vets charge for disposable of needle bins, or do you think I could just take one in and they will dispose FOC?

    Also, I have a question about lancets. Surprisingly I won't be using the pen but I find freehand is much better. Which, thankfully, means I do not need to purchase the Alphatrak2 specific lancets (hurrah!) and can go for a cheaper option. Any help on where I can get a good quality one for cheaper?

    Many thanks as always!
     
  21. Elizabeth and Bertie

    Elizabeth and Bertie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Hi Anna, I think it depends on where you live. ...My vet does charge for sharps disposal, I think. But I found out that our local council (Guildford) has a disposal service, for free, where they actually arrange to come round and collect sharps bins! :woot: ...When I arranged this I didn't say that these were for feline diabetes supplies, but then again...they didn't enquire about that... :rolleyes:

    You can reduce the volume of syringe waste considerably if you use a needle clipper. This little device clips the needle (the contaminated bit) off the syringe (and stores them neatly away), and then the syringe barrel itself can be disposed of in household waste. Before I discovered needle clippers I just used to snap the syringe bit off with a pair of pliers and put that bit in the sharps bin, and the syringe barrel in the bin. ...Here's the link to the BD clipper on Amazon. It's less than a fiver, so quite a bargain!
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/BD-SAFE-CLIP-NEEDLE-CLIPPER-1/dp/B007GX4US2/ref=sxts_sxwds-bia-wc-p13n1_0?cv_ct_cx=bd needle clipper&dchild=1&keywords=bd needle clipper&pd_rd_i=B007GX4US2&pd_rd_r=7e55cbb8-409a-4e4f-858c-89ec24496a32&pd_rd_w=IkFNt&pd_rd_wg=KL6UX&pf_rd_p=9b1a9511-9af9-4d06-8643-d54ebec511ef&pf_rd_r=G2ZFT5SF4W1DT8X90BJR&psc=1&qid=1597917172&sr=1-1-fdbae751-0fa5-4c0f-900b-865654896618

    I've never ever mastered using just the lancet to test with, so I honestly don't know which ones are best for that, but Mogs @Critter Mom might have some suggestions on that... They do come in slightly different shapes and maybe some are easier to hold/grip than others. The generic ones are very cheap to buy, way cheaper than the brand name ones...
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=lancets&rh=n:6285940031&ref=nb_sb_noss
     
  22. Georgiana & Perlutz

    Georgiana & Perlutz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    I always use the device but my boyfriend sometimes does it free hand with Freestyle lancets (almost identical to Alphatrak ones).

    my vet doesn’t charge for the sharps bins disposal and I always buy from Amazon
     
  23. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Just sticking my nose in here Anna with one or two asides (I leave the “where to buy” questions to other peeps with more up to date experience than I have)...

    One, I definitely think it’s easier to get blood “freehand” without using the lancet device - they can be quite awkward and cumbersome, and the clicking sound can be off putting. I used to find I had much more control with just the lancet so the whole process became quicker and less stressful. Well done for getting to that stage so early on!

    Two, you were saying that you regret getting the Alphatrak because strips are so expensive and as you’ve found, it’s easy to waste them. Were you going to get a human meter too, the Gluco Navii I think? Even if you think you may not use it rightaway, it’s not a bad idea to get one and work out how to use it so you have a back-up, for example if you run out of Alphatrak strips.
     
  24. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Hi Anna and Eliz. [​IMG]

    I used Abbot Lancets, the same ones as they offer under the 'Alphatrak' and 'Freestyle' branding. The Freestyle-branded ones were, unsurprisingly, about 50% cheaper than the Alphatrak-branded ones (they really do take the mick out of Alphatrak customers!). The Abbot-branded ones were about 50% cheaper than the Freestyle ones.

    I had a look on eBay just now and there are plenty of 28-gauge lancets on offer really cheap - a fiver or less for 100. The Freestyles are crazy expensive now (and mostly from overseas sellers) and the Abbot-branded ones are nowhere to be seen. Pity, because you can get a good, comfortable grip on them. (My anxiety disorder makes my hands a bit shaky.)


    Mogs
    .
     
  25. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Some Testing Tips:
    1. Fold a sheet of kitchen paper in four lengthwise and cut it up into 1" strips.

    2. Put a thin film of Vaseline (or Neosporin ointment) onto the edge of the ear to help the blood sample bead up instead of wicking into the fur.

    3. Make sure the ear is really, really warm (but not hot).

    4. Once you have the ear well warmed, wrap a strip of folded kitchen paper round your index finger then place finger under the ear you're testing.

    5. Use your thumb and middle finger to lightly but firmly grip the ear and paper strip in place so that the edge of the ear is taut but not overstretched; the little bit of tension will make it easier for the lancet to break the skin surface (and it helps to keep kitty's head from moving around too much).

    6. Hold the lancet with the bevelled edge of the point facing upwards. Try using the lancet freehand, at a slight angle to the ear, not perpendicular (easier to see where you're aiming and also makes skin prick easier).

    7. When it comes to the actual poke, prick the sweet spot on the edge of the ear in a similar way to how you might quickly prick a balloon with the tip of a needle to make it pop.

    8. When using the glucometer, bring the test strip to where it j-u-s-t comes into contact with the blood droplet and hold it there. The strip should then 'sip up' the amount it needs to run a valid test. Most meters beep to let you know that enough blood has been collected on the strip.

    9. After the test, fold the paper strip over the edge of the ear and apply gentle pressure for about 10-15 seconds to minimise bruising.

    Mogs
    .
     
  26. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    As a slight variation to Mogs’s No 1 tip above: instead of kitchen paper, I used to use strips cut from facial wipes - softer than kitchen roll and if you run it under the hot tap for a few seconds and then squeeze the water out, you get the added benefit of applying warmth to the ear, which should make it easier to get blood. (I remember suggesting this once before here and someone replied sounding horrified, saying that doing such a thing would burn the poor kitty’s ear... well, you make sure the wipe isn’t boiling hot, obvs......)
     
  27. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2020
    Im using a cotton ball to hold on the otherside of the ear, but will try your suggestions above. I havent been able to warm the ear for too long as Douglas gets fidgety, I also don't have a microwave so cannot quickly heat up rice bags.

    I havent tested him today but will start tomorrow before shots.
     
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  28. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Second member here today who can't do rice bags! :)

    I used a 3ml plastic pipette containing heated water to warm the sweet spot area on Saoirse's ear. You can get the pipettes on eBay. Here's a pic:


    [​IMG]


    Maybe a similar solution, using some sort of receptacle containing heated water, could work for you guys?

    Plastic pipettes are also really useful if you need to syringe water for your cat, e.g. when giving a water chaser after administering a pill. Much easier than a syringe because you just squeeze the bulb to let the water into the kitty's mouth. I find it much easier to control the angle of delivery into the mouth and flow rate of the water than with a syringe.


    Mogs
    .
     
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  29. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2020
    Great idea!
     
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  30. jt and trouble (GA)

    jt and trouble (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    THIRD
    although I dont need to warm up a rice sock :p

    Ive never owned a microwave.
     
  31. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    I never used a rice bag and tbh can never understand how people get on with them - surely they’re bulky and just make holding the ear more difficult. No microwave is no problem - hold the cottonwool/kitchen roll/face wipe against a hot kettle for a few seconds, job done :)
     
  32. jt and trouble (GA)

    jt and trouble (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    exactly, too simple I guess.
     
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  33. Gill & Mac (UK)

    Gill & Mac (UK) Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2020
    Hi

    We have the alphatrak 2 meter and I bought from Amazon - it was not cheap £98 but it was the one the vet recommended - another company (animed) had it in stock £13 cheaper but it didn't turn up and I wanted it fast so went back to amazon. But if you Google cat blood glucose monitors there are a few cheaper ones out there.

    At the moment I am on the syringes still that the vet handed me but they were not expensive (not branded ones). I (well Mac!) am on Caninsulin too & he seems to be doing well on it though it's early days. if you Google u40 cat insulin syringes lots come up from various companies - there are lots for around £20 for 100 .
    PS if you have pet insurance check with them as I had a nice surprise when I found they will reimburse for my meter

    All the best to you and your kitty !


     
  34. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2020
    Thanks! I ordered with Animed, waited a week and they still hadn't despatched. Contacted them to find out why and they said they are busy with lots of orders because of Covid-19. But then later that evening got an email to say that they out of stock and will refund me. Annoying. Ended up ordering the one from Amazon as well.
     
  35. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    That’s not good service is it, regardless of Covid. Lots of us would prefer to buy somewhere other than Amazon, but they rarely let you down. From now on I’d suggest keeping a good stock of supplies so you don’t have to bite your nails wondering if they’ll arrive when you need them.
     
  36. Douglas_my ginger cat

    Douglas_my ginger cat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2020
    You've read my mind. I've ordered extra test strips via Amazon, just in case but when they arrive I'll start buying from other places where I can allow for additional time on despatch and delivery.
     
  37. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    That’s it!
     

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