? 4/12/21 Kierra's 2nd IGF-1 test

Discussion in 'Acromegaly / IAA / Cushings Cats' started by Diane and Kierra, Apr 12, 2021.

  1. Diane and Kierra

    Diane and Kierra Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Her 1st IGF-1 test over 2 months ago was 393 (blood draw Jan 19). Her 2nd test (blood draw Apr 1) is 440. Anyone know if that is a significant change? Or maybe it is good news that is hasn't changed that much?
     
  2. Wendy&Neko

    Wendy&Neko Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    I've seen bigger changes. Why did you retest?
     
  3. Diane and Kierra

    Diane and Kierra Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    To confirm the test and also see if there had been any changes.
     
  4. Suzanne & Darcy

    Suzanne & Darcy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2020
    How is Kierra doing?
     
  5. Wendy&Neko

    Wendy&Neko Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    I've not seen someone ever have a false positive. And changes are likely over time, but don't really mean anything that I know of.
     
  6. Diane and Kierra

    Diane and Kierra Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    I think she is doing pretty good. We are starting to see more response to the Lantus. Her weight seems to have leveled off at around 17 pounds after a big weight gain that was concerning. Her coat is looking really good. She is staying more hydrated (I haven't given fluids in quite a while). She is not as ravenous but still has a healthy appetite. The vet wants to do a CT scan which we might do, not sure yet. We are trying a stem cell activator/immune strengthening product. We have done one round and are starting on another round this week. It is about 20 IM injections given over 4 weeks time. It is something Dr. Deva Khalsa has had good success with on some cancers but has not tried with acromegaly before. Truthfully I don't know what is helping. We are also doing other things like acupuncture, some supplements including Xiao Ke Fang, Ramaeker's nutrition powder, B12+folic acid, some standard process supplements like pancreatrophin pmg. I do some daily acupressure work too. Here is a link to an article by Dr. Khalsa on the stem cell therapy: http://www.doctordeva.com/wp-content/uploads/AW_V20I4_Stem-cell-secrets-1.pdf
     
    Suzanne & Darcy likes this.
  7. Diane and Kierra

    Diane and Kierra Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    I mostly was hoping to see a decrease in response to the stem cell therapy. Are you saying a change in the number doesn't mean anything, like if it went from 500 and to 200 even? Wouldn't that mean something or would it reflect the variation that happens with the tumor. Guess is was a waste of $155 USD.
     
  8. Suzanne & Darcy

    Suzanne & Darcy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2020
    Wow. You are trying a lot of different things. I'm happy to hear that she seems well, has a good appetite and that he weight has stabilized. You are doing so much for her. I bet your love and good care is paying off. I can see how much you LOVE her. It's beautiful.
     
  9. Wendy&Neko

    Wendy&Neko Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    I know what it feels like to be helpless to help your cat with a disease, and to want to try anything and everything.:bighug: However, my approach is and has been science based.

    There has been no research that I know of on stem cells an acromegaly. Acromegaly is not cancer but a benign tumour. In fact, just found an article saying stem cells are useless on the pituitary gland. Neko went to a vet clinic for her acupuncture where they did stem cell work, it was not something they even discussed as a possibility. Neko did get acupuncture and acupressure from me daily, when her arthritis got so she needed it so those are good tools to continue giving.

    To me it sounds like the vet is wasting your money that could otherwise go towards either cabergoline or something that has been proven to work with acros. I would NOT get a CT scan unless you either like spending money or are going forward with treatment such as SRT or surgery. Besides the cost, it's an extra anaesthesia and with acros I wouldn't do that unless there was a good reason for it.

    The standard process pancreas supplement is also a waste of money. Acros often have a working pancreas, it's the pituitary tumour that is overwhelming the insulin put out by the pancreas. Remember, Kierra is a different kind of diabetic. The treatments your vet is experimenting with seem to be focussed on an animal with a damaged pancreas. The focus should be the pituitary instead.
     
  10. Suzanne & Darcy

    Suzanne & Darcy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2020
    I don't know a whole lot about stem cell therapy in animals. I do have a friend who rescued a cat with a shattered leg. The vet used stem cell infusions from the kitty's own body on the leg, and it healed completely.

    My only other experience with stem cell therapy is that my brother had ALS. He and my sister-in-law went to Thailand in 2018 for him to receive stem cell infusions (harvested from his own stem cells, I believe). This was to help the ALS. It did not, and we lost him January 2019.

    I suppose one day we will do a lot of good with stem cells. I'm sure it's a promising therapy for some conditions (that and gene therapy).
     
  11. Tomlin

    Tomlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2019
    I see that you are in WA :). I wanted to provide you an additional resource that may be of help to you and your vet.

    You actually have the first vet in the U.S. to have performed the transsphenoidal hypophysectomy working in your state:bighug:. Dr Tina Owen first performed the surgery in LA but then later moved to WSU. At one point, WSU was the only vet hospital in the U.S. performing the surgery, but now additional hospitals are doing it. She trained the vet in my area (UF) to do the surgery & they are about to start doing the surgeries as well:). Like WSU, the goal will be a comprehensive Pituitary Center to not only provide surgery, but also to provide and to study additional treatment options given that surgery is not always an option. It is nice to be able to discuss all treatment and management options with the experts in this area and to determine a best course based on your specific situation. Even for pet parents who are interested in the surgery, it is not always an option based on tumor size (&/or potential tentacles extending from the tumor—dependent on the MRI either no surgery or surgery with radiation therapy), tumor location &/ or if a pet is older and compromised to the extent that a good outcome would not be likely. There may also be limitations for certain treatments secondary to cost for the pet parent. Having specialists who have extensive clinical & research experience, latest info and colleagues they can call to discuss a case, is very helpful with making both management and treatment decisions that are going to be best for the pet and the pet parent(s). It is not an extremely large group worldwide that have comprehensive treatment facilities so they all do communicate with each other to help make forward progress.

    The Pituitary Center at WSU is wonderful to speak/work with :). If you call the main hospital # and ask to speak with the pituitary surgery group, they get you in touch with the coordinator and they provide really helpful and up to date information. I saw that you mentioned Cushings as well in a prior thread. That is actually part of their work up & if you ask about it, they will walk you through what they currently recommend, when and why.

    Again, even if you are not interested in the surgery, they have the comprehensive program that I mentioned earlier and they would be able to help you and your vet by providing the latest information pertaining to all the treatment & management options. Most of the vets at U settings are willing to consult with your vet if your vet reaches out to them. Some are also able to speak directly with clients. It all depends on the laws in a particular state. Again, even if they are unable to consult with you directly (if they haven’t seen your pet), they are usually are willing and happy to consult directly with your vet.

    I also want to mention that I believe that Dr Owens group may have started a study that does provide for a free CT. This study is an attempt to replicate a study and the findings from one done by Dr Niessen at RVC. Again, reach out to them and they will be happy to give you all the details :).

    Wishing you the best!


    Some links:

    Dr Owen
    https://vcs.vetmed.wsu.edu/people/faculty/profile/tina-owen

    WSU Pituitary Program
    https://vth.vetmed.wsu.edu/specialties/small-animal-surgery/pituitary-surgery

    WSU Main #: 509-335-0711
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2021
  12. Wendy&Neko

    Wendy&Neko Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
  13. Tomlin

    Tomlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2019
    @Wendy&Neko Awesome :). Actually, that’s not the study I was referring to. The one they are trying to replicate is pertaining to diagnostics vs the actual surgery.
     
  14. Wendy&Neko

    Wendy&Neko Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    I didn't mean they were the same study, just that Diane had already contacted WSU already was in that post. Also in that post is a link to work being done at UC Davis.
     
  15. Tomlin

    Tomlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2019
    Hopefully, WSU has started the study with the free CT :). I saw that it was mentioned—her vet wanted a CT and this would be a way to get it with no financial burden which is really nice. It’s also good for anyone else who runs across the thread to know it is another location with some help with cost if they would like the imaging.
     
  16. Tomlin

    Tomlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2019
    Hi. I wanted to send the link for the contact info & details for the study at WSU that I mentioned that pays for testing (IGF-1 and Fructosamine) and then CT +/-MR imaging in case you decide to pursue it. FREE is always nice if/when possible!! I am not certain if having a previous IGF-1 test excludes a cat from participating....hopefully not, but you would have to call or email them and ask.

    https://vcs.vetmed.wsu.edu/research...19/09/24/insulin-dependent-diabetic-cat-study
     

Share This Page